News by Region

NDIS frustration for mum who asks Minister to attend meeting after [autistic] child denied wheelchair

A woman who says she has been denied a new wheelchair for her severely disabled daughter has invited her local MP — who is also the Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme — to sit in on a meeting about the girl's needs.

Gold Coast resident Shannon Manning said seven-year-old Meadow had severe autism and required a wheelchair to go out in public, but had been knocked back because she was "not disabled enough".

More Victorian students diagnosed with severe behaviour disorders

Ashley Argoon

Victorian school kids are being diagnosed with severe behaviour disorders at rocketing rates as a principal claims children have to reach “crisis level” before they get support.

The number of children funded for severe behaviour — disruptive and sometimes violent conduct — is escalating, with almost double the cases to four years ago.

Andrew Bolt's mocking of Greta Thunberg leaves autism advocates 'disgusted'

Australian News Corp columnist Andrew Bolt labels 16-year-old environmental activist ‘strange’ and ‘disturbed’

News Corp’s Andrew Bolt showed “absolute ignorance” when he mocked the teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg in a column for the Herald Sun, an autism awareness advocate says.

The high-profile columnist for Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers and Sky News commentator attacked the 16-year-old campaigner as “deeply disturbed”, “freakishly influential” and “strange” in the piece published on Wednesday.

Autism rate increase despite NDIS rules

sign: national disability insurance agency

Angus Livingston

The number of people who need autism support from the National Disability Insurance Scheme is still rising despite rules being tightened to exclude more applicants.

New data shows autism rates of people accepted into the NDIS are increasing, even though the rate of people with autism rendered ineligible for the scheme has jumped significantly.

The NDIS cracked down on autism diagnoses in early 2018 and data released on Tuesday shows growth in access to the scheme trended down after a high point in June last year.

IT giant giving people with autism employment hope

There's a push in many Australian workplaces towards cultural diversity and gender diversity, but what about neurodiversity? A third of people on the autism spectrum are unemployed - more than six times the average. Now one of the biggest names in technology believes people with autism are an untapped resource of brains that think differently.

Transcript


LAURA TINGLE, PRESENTER: There's a push in many Australian workplaces towards cultural diversity and gender diversity but what about neuro diversity?

One in three people on the autism spectrum are unemployed - more than six times the average.

The Neurodiversity Movement Should Acknowledge Autism as a Medical Disability

Yuval Levental

Autism doesn’t have to define a person’s identity

The autism researcher Simon Baron-Cohen published an article, “The Concept of Neurodiversity Is Dividing the Autism Community,” where he defends the neurodiversity perspective. There are several specific arguments in his article, but overall, he views autism as a biological difference, not a disability.

Treating suspected autism at 12 months of age improves children's language skills

Andrew Whitehouse; Kandice Varcin, and Kristelle Hudry

Therapies given to infants before they receive a diagnosis of autism may lead to important improvements in their language abilities, according to our new research published today in the journal Lancet Child and Adolescent Health.

Children with autism typically begin therapy after receiving a diagnosis, which usually doesn’t occur until at least two years of age.

However, our new study suggests that starting therapy with 12-month-old infants who show early behavioural signs of autism may provide additional benefit.

Majority of autism risk resides in genes, multinational study suggests

About 81 percent of autism risk comes from inherited genetic factors, according to an analysis of more than 2 million children from five countries, published today in JAMA Psychiatry1.

The study is the largest yet to estimate the heritability of autism risk in a multinational population. The findings are consistent with results from a large 2017 study of twin and non-twin sibling pairs in Sweden that suggested about 83 percent of autism risk is inherited2. A third study — also in Sweden and also in twins — reported in 2010 that these factors contribute to about 80 percent of autism risk3.

The new study improves upon the previous work by analyzing multiple generations of families from several countries.

Phew! Indian Catholic priest who claims parents' sins cause autism in children cancels Australia tour

An Indian Catholic priest who claims to have "cured" autism through prayer and compared autistic children to "animals", has cancelled a planned series of religious retreats in Australia.

Key points:

  • Father Dominic Valanmanal was due to hold a sold-out retreat on Phillip Island and another in Canberra
  • The Indian Catholic community in Australia hails largely from the Indian state of Kerala, where Father Valanmanal is based
  • A campaign to stop his visit was backed by Autism support groups

Father Dominic Valanmanal was recently forced to cancel similar events in Ireland and Canada, after a video clip appeared online showing him preaching that autism in children was caused by the vice of their parents.

Report highlights deep-rooted inequality in NDIS

This article relates to people with disability generally; it is not specific to ASD.

Shannon Jenkins

Males and people with higher incomes are more likely to benefit from the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) than other demographic groups are, according to a new report.

The article by BMC Public Health, a journal which looks at the community impact of health policy and practice, studied how social determinants of health at the individual level can contribute to deep-seated health inequalities when combined with complex policy-delivery systems.

It found the ability to exercise choice is distributed unequally through personalisation schemes like the NDIS.

Unusual eating behaviors may be a new diagnostic indicator for autism

Atypical eating behaviors may be a sign a child should be screened for autism, according to a new study from Penn State College of Medicine.

Research by Susan Mayes, professor of psychiatry, found that atypical eating behaviors were present in 70% of children with autism, which is 15 times more common than in neurotypical children.

Atypical eating behaviors may include severely limited food preferences, hypersensitivity to food textures or temperatures, and pocketing food without swallowing.

Autism, a neurotype not an insult

Sandra Jones

A decade ago I was participating in a research seminar at an Australian university and one of the academics responded to a presentation about autism with the comment “all academics are a little bit autistic”.

Recently, I was speaking to a colleague about a someone from another university that she found hard to deal with. My colleague told me of the trouble she was having and finished up with “you know how he is … a bit on the spectrum”.

Family struggling to find carers for autistic daughter despite NDIS funding

Helen Campbell knows the risk her daughter Annie poses to the community because she has experienced it herself.

Key points:

  • Annie Campbell has complex care needs
  • Her mother says she has struggled to find carers willing to work with her
  • The NDIA says it is working with the family to find a solution

In 2013, a small change to Annie's routine during a tenpin bowling excursion resulted in a violent meltdown.

Child Development Institute opens in Wollongong to help kids with autism

Lisa Wachsmuth

Just weeks after starting sessions at Wollongong's new early intervention centre, little Samson Howari stretched out his arms, looked his mum in the eye and asked for a cuddle.

For most parents of toddlers that's pretty cute - for the mother of a two-year-old with a severe level of autism, it was monumental.

Ballarat Tech School will host The Lab for 10-16 year olds with ASD interested in technology

Michelle Smith

Young people with Asperger's Syndrome or high functioning autism and an interest in technology will have a new place to come together when The Lab begins in Ballarat next month.

The Lab offers individual and group mentoring, for children aged 10 to 16 on the autism spectrum, from IT professionals in web and digital design, programming and game making in a fun and safe place where they can socialise with others who share their interests.

Pages

Subscribe to News by Region